Vin Tweets! Dodgers Rejoice!

VinScullyPicIt was big news this week when 85-year old Vin Scully, “The Voice of the Dodgers” who has been their play-by-play announcer since 1950, was slated to take over the Dodgers’ twitter feed for the game between the Yankees and Dodgers at Yankee Stadium.

Recalling a story I saw at the beginning of the season where Scully admitted he had no idea about what he just read.

VinHashtagApril

What in the world is hashtag?

That’s perfect because last night we got this:

DodgerBaseball

Note the hashtag: #VinScully

Sometimes the best way to learn is to be immersed.

Similar to “Garbo Talks!”
1930AnnaChristie
The publicity generated via social media about Scully’s twitter stint was reminiscent of another famous campaign which took place way back in 1930 (Scully was merely a toddler).

MGM marketers used the catch-phrase “Garbo talks!” to promote Greta Garbo’s first talking film, Anna Christie (1930), for which she received an Academy Award nomination.

Her opening line of dialogue was widely quoted and became classic: She wearily enters a waterfront saloon and orders the bartender to “Gimme a visky with chincher ale on the side-and don`t be stingy, baby.”

And here is a rundown of what Vin had to say on Twitter. There is a lot of backstory — much like he gives during a broadcast, along with commentary on what’s happening on the field.

VinTweetsStories

VinWrapTweets

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Personally, I look forward to home games because I know I get to hear his stories (I have the DirecTV MLB package). The man is a gifted raconteur.

You can join the 300K+ following the Dodgers on Twitter by clicking here.

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And for those who don’t know about “Annie Christie,” here is some backstory. Jedemi LP Frannie was intimately involved in creating the words Garbo spoke.

The 74 minute, black and white Anna Christie was adapted (by influential screenwriter Frances Marion) from Eugene O’Neill’s play of the same name. It had earlier been a stage play, and had been filmed by producer Thomas H. Ince and director John Griffith Wray as a silent picture in 1923, with Blanche Sweet as the heroine, and George F. Marion in the same role that he played onstage (and in this version).

In the famed, immortalized scene that is about sixteen minutes into the film, a weary and ailing, man-hating Swedish-American streetwalker Anna Gustafson Christie (Greta Garbo), searching for her estranged barge captain father Chris Gustafson (George F. Marion) to seek redemption, makes her grand entrance into a NY Battery waterfront saloon from a foggy street. The bar’s waiter holds open the door to the Ladies Entrance as she struggles in. She shuffles over to a wooden table across from where her father’s boozing companion Marthy (Marie Dressler) sits, and drops her suitcase onto the floor. Anna takes a seat in a chair, crouches down, and finally delivers her famous opening lines.

In a deep and husky, heavily-accented voice, she orders:

Anna: Gimme a whiskey, ginger ale on the side. And don’t be stingy, baby!

Waiter: (sarcastically) Well, shall I serve it in a pail?

Anna: (bluntly) Ah, that suits me down to the ground. (After the whiskey is served and downed) Gee, I needed that bad all right, all right.

Source: Filmsite.org

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